BriteVu Perfused Alligator Kidney SEM

BriteVu Perfused Alligator Kidney SEM

As part of a research project using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), BriteVu perfused alligator kidney was evaluated. Because of an equipment failure, the kidney tissue was not coated (which normally reduces electron charging). We decided to go ahead with the SEM anyways. The end result was that the tissues were overcharged (especially the BriteVu perfused vessels) creating bright spots. These bright spots actually highlight the location of the contrast agent within the tissues.  BriteVu is seen as the ‘bright spots’ in between…

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Savannah Monitor Coelom Perfused with BriteVu CT Contrast Medium

Savannah Monitor Coelom Perfused with BriteVu CT Contrast Medium

Preliminary (low resolution) image of a high radiodensity contrast perfused savannah monitor with metabolic bone disease and osteomyeltitis (bone infection). Two of the most interesting findings are the ‘cross hatch’ pattern of the spinal vasculature and the kidneys.  The head is to the left and tail to the right.  The kidneys are at the far right of the image.  The monitor was CT scanned at 0.6 mm.

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Alligator Distal Colon and Kidney Contrast Perfusion with BriteVu

Alligator Distal Colon and Kidney Contrast Perfusion with BriteVu

An alligator was perfused via the ventral coelomic (abdominal) vein with BriteVu.  Internal organs were removed and CT scanned at 35µm for better visualization.  The distal colon and kidney are scanned as one unit.  The colon is on the top and terminates to the left and seemingly joins the kidney on the bottom left.  Courtesy of Dr Colleen Farmer, Farmer Lab, University of Utah.

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Alligator Stomach and Liver BriteVu Contrast Perfusion

Alligator Stomach and Liver BriteVu Contrast Perfusion

An alligator was perfused via the ventral coelomic (abdominal) vein with BriteVu.  Internal organs were removed and CT scanned at 35µm for better visualization.  The stomach and liver are scanned as one unit.  The stomach is to the right and liver to the left. Courtesy of Dr Colleen Farmer, Farmer Lab, University of Utah.

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