Ball Python Kidney Perfused with BriteVu

Ball Python Kidney Perfused with BriteVu

Ball python (Python regius) kidney perfused with BriteVu Mouse.  The ball python kidney blood supply is beautifully shown with the aid of BriteVu contrast and a CAT scan (Siemens Inveon micro CT scanner 50 µm ‘slice thickness’).  The paired renal artery and vein are seen along with the smaller vasculature along the elongated kidney typical of snakes.  BriteVu brings large and small vascular anatomy to life in ways that have never been seen before.  This creates new learning and teaching…

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Ball Python Head Perfused with BriteVu

Ball Python Head Perfused with BriteVu

Ball python (Python regius) head.  The python was perfused with BriteVu plus 2% Dawn Ultra dish soap. A Siemens Inveon micro CT scanner (50 µm ‘slice thickness’) was used to obtain the images.  False color was added to this lateral (side) image of the head.  Note the small vessels exiting the ‘heat pits’ on the side of the upper jaw in front of (rostral to) the eye ring.  These pits are believed to be used for infrared sensing.  The degree of…

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Argentine Black and White Tegu Head perfused with BriteVu

Argentine Black and White Tegu Head perfused with BriteVu

Argentine black and white tegu BriteVu arteriovenogram of the head. Courtesy of Dr Colleen Farmer, Department of Biology, University of Utah. This is a ventral (underside) view of the skull showing all of the blood vessels.  Notice the rich blood supply around the powerful lower jaws (mandibles). The tongue can be seen coursing out of the tip of the snout (and aimed toward the top of the picture).   BriteVu was used in the perfusion process. These are 100 µm CT scan slices.

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Argentine B&W Tegu BriteVu Perfusion of Head

Argentine B&W Tegu BriteVu Perfusion of Head

Argentine black and white tegu BriteVu arteriovenogram of the head. Courtesy of Dr Colleen Farmer, Department of Biology, University of Utah. The vasculature is seen all the way to the tip of the tongue. There are several interesting anatomic features of this animal including a radiating vascular ring inside both nares.  This is a lateral view of the head.

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BriteVu Perfused Alligator Kidney SEM

BriteVu Perfused Alligator Kidney SEM

As part of a research project using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), BriteVu perfused alligator kidney was evaluated. Because of an equipment failure, the kidney tissue was not coated (which normally reduces electron charging). We decided to go ahead with the SEM anyways. The end result was that the tissues were overcharged (especially the BriteVu perfused vessels) creating bright spots. These bright spots actually highlight the location of the contrast agent within the tissues.  BriteVu is seen as the ‘bright spots’ in between…

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Savannah Monitor Coelom Perfused with BriteVu CT Contrast Medium

Savannah Monitor Coelom Perfused with BriteVu CT Contrast Medium

Preliminary (low resolution) image of a high radiodensity contrast perfused savannah monitor with metabolic bone disease and osteomyeltitis (bone infection). Two of the most interesting findings are the ‘cross hatch’ pattern of the spinal vasculature and the kidneys.  The head is to the left and tail to the right.  The kidneys are at the far right of the image.  The monitor was CT scanned at 0.6 mm.

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Alligator Distal Colon and Kidney Contrast Perfusion with BriteVu

Alligator Distal Colon and Kidney Contrast Perfusion with BriteVu

An alligator was perfused via the ventral coelomic (abdominal) vein with BriteVu.  Internal organs were removed and CT scanned at 35µm for better visualization.  The distal colon and kidney are scanned as one unit.  The colon is on the top and terminates to the left and seemingly joins the kidney on the bottom left.  Courtesy of Dr Colleen Farmer, Farmer Lab, University of Utah.

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Alligator Stomach and Liver BriteVu Contrast Perfusion

Alligator Stomach and Liver BriteVu Contrast Perfusion

An alligator was perfused via the ventral coelomic (abdominal) vein with BriteVu.  Internal organs were removed and CT scanned at 35µm for better visualization.  The stomach and liver are scanned as one unit.  The stomach is to the right and liver to the left. Courtesy of Dr Colleen Farmer, Farmer Lab, University of Utah.

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